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1988 January – June

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  • National Geographic January 1988

    Centennial Issue - 1888-1988

    One Hundred Years of increasing and diffusing geographic knowledge

    16 in stock

  • National Geographic February 1988

    Living in Two Worlds: The First Australians { The First Australians: Living in Two Worlds}
    Life is a balancing act for Aborigines who struggle to maintain their unique cultural heritage in the modern world.
    Sydney's Changing Face
    A photo- essay of Australia's immigrants. Photos by Mary Ellen Mark.
    Children of the First Fleet
    Banished to the farthest corner of the earth, a cargo of British convicts inaugurated a nation when they landed at Sydney on January 26, 1788. One of those aboard the infamous First Fleet was Matthew Everingham, transported for stealing two law books. ;D
    Australia at 200
    On the eve of its bicentennial, Australia reveals itself as a nation embracing inevitable change and promising opportunities for the future.
    Portraits of the Land
    Rust red sand underlies the heart of Australia, where the huge monoliths known as the Olgas shoulder above spinifex and grevillea. This old and worn continent has a look like no other - - celebrated in this portfolio by poets and others, both the native
    Child of Gondwana
    165 million years ago Australia was part of a massive landmass refered to as Gondwana. Today this southern continent stands alone, boasting a unique diversity of plant and animals species.

    12 in stock

  • National Geographic March 1988

    China Passage by Rail { China Passage}
    A changing people and changeless landscapes come into view as Paul Theroux and Geographic photographer Bruce Dale travel the railways of the world's most populous nation.
    Exploring America's Forgotten Century { Exploring Our Lost Century; Exploring Our Forgotten Century: Between Columbus and Jamestown}
    A decade of digging by archeologists and scholars illuminates the neglected first chapter in our country's history, the years between Columbus and Jamestown. Joseph Judge reports, with photographs by Bill Ballenberg and paintings by John Berkey.
    Announcing a New National Geographic Society Foundation { Announcing the Society's New Education Foundation; President Grosvenor Announces the National Geographic Society Education Foundation}
    President Gilbert M. Grosvenor establishes an education foundation to accept contributions and ensure permanent support for the teaching of geography in U. S. classrooms. A prospectus by educator Lloyd H. Elliot.
    Hello Anchorage, Good- Bye Dream
    Anchorage copes with the realities of urban life and struggles to regain the riches of the oil boom. Larry L. King and photographer Chris Johns reveal the growing pains of Alaska's largest city.
    Wildlife Portfolio { Falkland Islands Wildlife: A Portfolio}
    Food- rich waters around the Falklands support a spectacular mix of birds and animals. A photographic portfolio by Frans Lanting.
    The Falkland Islands- -Life After the War
    Falklanders are still British and newly prosperous just six years after the deadly contest waged by Britain and Argentina over their South Atlantic homeland. Bryan Hodgson and photographer Steve Raymer assess their life today.

    18 in stock

  • National Geographic April 1988

    Ghosts of War in the South Pacific
    During World War II hundreds of aircraft and ships went down in the South Pacific. Peter Benchley recounts the action and, with photographer David Doubilet, discovers that marine organisms have transformed wrecks into magnificent living memorials.
    Riddle of the Pyramid Boats
    Why did the ancient Egyptians disassemble and bury two full- sized royal ships near the tomb of the great pharaoh Khufu? What purposes did the vessel serve? Peter Miller investigates the puzzle. Photographs by Victor R. Boswell, Jr.
    Finding a Pharaoh's Funeral Bark
    Scientists penetrate a crypt near Egypt's Great Pyramid to reveal a sacred craft unseen for 4, 600 years. By Farouk El- Baz, with photographs by James P. Blair and Claude E. Petrone.
    Texas in Bloom
    The Lone Star State finds a place in the sun for wildflowers, says the First Lady of beautification, Lady Bird Johnson.
    Wildflowers Across America
    Artist Jack Unruh captures the astonishing color and variety of the blooms that nature plants from eastern woodlands to high mountain meadows. With text by Michael E. Long.
    Uganda- -Land Beyond Sorrow
    Death has become a way of life in this once prosperous East African nation, ravaged by two decades of anarchy, chaos, and massacres, and now by the specter of AIDS. Robert Caputo reports.
    Wreck of the [ Coolidge]
    David Doubilet takes us on a tour of the President Coolidge, luxury liner turned troop transport, which sank in 1942 at Espiritu Santo en route to reinforce Allied forces at Guadalcanal.

    18 in stock

  • National Geographic May 1988

    Fleas: The Lethal Leapers
    Biologist- photographer Nicole Duplaix investigates the incredible feats of these infamous insects, whose ability to pass plague to humans changed the course of history.
    Living in Harm's Way- -The Persian Gulf { The Persian Gulf- -Living in Harm's Way}
    In a timely report from the strategic waterway, Thomas J. Abercrombie and photographer Steve Raymer describe the people caught in the shadow of the ongoing Iraq- Iran war.
    Death of a Star { Supernova- -Death of a Star}
    Suddenly last year a new light blazed in the southern skies, giving astronomers an unprecedented look at a supernova a mere 170, 000 light- years away. Astrophysicist Robert P. Kirshner explains the phenomenon; Roger H. Ressmeyer photographs its study ar
    India's Unpredictable Kerala, Jewel of the Malabar Coast { Kerala, Jewel of India's Malabar Coast}
    A national pacesetter in health, education, and religious tolerance, this cosmopolitan state on India's southwestern coast has never shied from political controversy, according to Peter Miller. Photographs by Raghubir Singh.
    Wool- -Fabric of History
    In a world- ranging quest, fashion expert Nina Hyde and photographer Cary Wolinski explore the extraordinary fiber, gift of wandering animals, that is still vital to human culture.

    6 in stock

  • National Geographic June 1988

    The Eternal Etruscans
    Three thousand years ago the Etruscans forged Italy's first civilization. Writer Rick Gore and photographer O. Louis Mazzatenta explore that little- known culture and what is left behind. With paintings by James M. Gurney.
    Ellesmere Island- -Life in the High Arctic { Life in the High Arctic- -Ellesmere Island}
    Biologist L. David Mech documents the struggle of wildlife to survive in Canada's northernmost reach. Photographs by Jim Brandenburg.
    Palio, Siena's Wild 90- Second Horse Race { Palio, Siena's Centuries- Old 90- second Horse Race}
    Citizens of Siena, once an Etruscan center, continue a danger- filled tradition of horse racing. Photos by O. Louis Mazzatenta.
    Yorktown Shipwreck
    Scuttled in the Battle of Yorktown, a British naval transport yields clues to 18th- century ships and tactics, relates archeologist John D. Broadwater. Photos by Bates Littlehales.
    Coelacanths, the Fish That Time Forgot
    A fish known only from fossils and believed to be extinct was found living in the Indian Ocean in 1938. Now a German teams dives in a submersible to study coelacanths in their deep haunts. By marine biologist Hans Fricke.
    Guatemala: A Fragile Democracy
    After years of mismanagement and guerrilla warfare, this key Central American nation opts for civilian democratic rule, and now faces the challenge of unifying its diverse peoples. Griffin Smith, Jr. , reports on encounters with the unexpected. Photogra;

    15 in stock

SKU: NG19881HY Category:

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