Search Results for: china

National Geographic February 2000

By Eric

The Rise of Life on Earth { The Rise of Life on Earth- -Messel: Window on an Ancient World}
Forty- nine million years ago dinosaurs were long extinct and mammals on the ascent. Species of that time have been remarkably preserved in a mine pit at Messel, Germany.
Albanians: A People Undone
Scattered from the Balkans to the Bronx, Albanians hold fast to what they have left – an impoverished Eastern European homeland and deep ethnic pride.
Ancient Greece II { Ascent to Glory: Ancient Greece, Part II}
Elegant proportions and riotous color, tragedy and comedy, democracy and slavery: The roots and realities of the Classical Age belie our assumptions in the second of a three- part series.
Black Dragon River: On the Edge of Empires
A narrow ribbon of water separates two worlds that could hardly be more different: an impoverished corner of Russia and China’s economically energized Heilongjiang Province.
Eyewitness Kosovo
During the grim months before NATO intervened in Kosovo, a French photographer witnessed the anguish and upheaval of the Balkans’ recurring bloodbath.
Selma to Montgomery: The Road to Equality
A 1965 protest march from a small Alabama city to the state capital sparked Congress to ensure protection of black Americans’ right to vote.
Orphan Gorillas: Fighting to Survive in the Wild { Central Africa’s Orphan Gorillas: Will They Survive in the Wild? }
In Congo and Gabon dedicated workers evaded civil war to nurture, socialize, and ultimately release western lowland gorillas back into the wild.

National Geographic March 2000

By Eric

Hard Rock Legacy
Gold, silver, and other hardrock mining contributed to a colorful page to the history of the American West. Tainted by past blunders, the modern- day industry struggles to reconcile high stakes economics with sound environmental practices.
Ancient Greece III { Alexander the Conqueror: Ancient Greece, Part III}
After Alexander the Great’s 12- year campaign of slaughter and conquest his Greek language and culture linked kingdoms from Egypt to the Indus Valley for three centuries.
Beijing: New Face For the Ancient Capital
Bolstered by foreign investment, Beijing’s booming economy is transforming the cityscape of China’s ancient capital as well as the lifestyle and expectations of its inhabitants.
Bugging Out: Into Madidi’s Teeming Jungle, a Photographer’s Journal
A photographer’s dream can also be his worst nightmare. Join Joel Sartore in Madidi as he waits for killer swine, digs burrowing maggots from his flesh, and sleeps with bats and sweat bees.
Madidi National Park { Madidi: Bolivia’s Spectacular New National Park; Madidi: Will Bolivia Drown Its New National Park? }
Champions of Bolivia’s new national park hope ecotourism will preserve this extraordinarily diverse corner of the Amazon, but a hydroelectric dam could jeopardize its future.
Stone Cold Ascent
In the wicked Patagonian winter four men scale the sheer west face of Cerro Torre, a rare and dangerous first in the world of rock climbing.
Arctic Submarine { The New Cold War: Stalking Arctic Climate Change by Submarine}
Beneath the icy surface of the Arctic Ocean, scientists aboard a Navy submarine map uncharted waters and gather clues about Earth’s changing climate.

National Geographic March 1996

By Eric

Emperor Penguins { Emperors of the Ice}
Embracing the coldest climate on earth, these avian royals reproduce during the Antarctic winter.
The Dawn of Humans: Face- to- Face with Lucy’s Family
New fossils from Ethiopia help flesh out the oldest skeleton in our ancestral closet.
Xinjiang
Horsemen become farmers and deserts sprout oil wells as China resettles and develops its wild west.
The Silk Road’s Lost World
Mummies with Caucasian features recall a culture that thrived in Xinjiang 3, 000 years ago.
Macedonia: Caught in the Middle
Independence came in 1991 to the onetime Yugoslav republic, but national unity remains elusive.
Hudson River { Heart of the Hudson}
A spirited sense of community is reinvigorating New York’s historic river valley region.

National Geographic April 1996

By Eric

A Century of Research and Exploration { Understanding Our World}
Projects funded by the Committee for Research and Exploration enrich and enthrall.
The Aran Islands: Ancient Hearts, Modern Minds
Some 1, 400 Gaelic speakers hold down a fortress of tradition off the west coast of Ireland.
The Anasazi { The Old Ones of the Southwest}
As archaeologists penetrate the mysteries of the ancient Anasazi, new questions arise.
Trout { A Passion for Trout}
The quest for these denizens of cold clear water is more than sport: It’s a way of life.
China’s Buddhist Caves { Pilgrimage to China’s Buddhist Caves}
Centuries- old images of devotion grace caverns along China’s Silk Road.
Storming the Tower
Using hands, feet, and nerve, four Wyoming cowboys scale 3, 000- foot Trango Tower in the Himalaya.
Jerusalem { The Three Faces of Jerusalem}
Holy to Jews, Christians, and Muslims, this storied city struggles to balance religion, politics, and power.

National Geographic October 1996

By Eric

Baffin Island Trek { Traversing Baffin Island}
In a six- month odyssey, a team of adventurers take on Canada’s largest island.
Kuril Islands { Storm Watch Over the Kurils: Russia and Japan Contest a Wild Island Chain}
Controlled by Russia, claimed by Japan, these storm- tossed islands straddle prized Pacific fishing grounds.
Life Without Light
Mussels and tube worms thrive on bacteria nourished by gas and oil seeps deep in the Gulf of Mexico.
Morocco: North Africa’s Timeless Mosaic
The storied North African kingdom faces harsh realities of poverty, unemployment, and overpopulation.
China’s Terra- cotta Warriors { China’s Warriors Rise From the Earth}
Near Xian, 8, 000 life- size soldiers emerge from the mausoleum of China’s first emperor.
African Gold { Royal Gold of the Asante Empire}
The regalia of an Asante king in Ghana dazzles his subjects at the lavish celebration of his 25- year reign.
National Wildlife Refuges { Sanctuary: U. S. National Wildlife Refuges}
Sanctuaries for waterfowl and other species guard critical habitat against growing pressures.

National Geographic January 1997

By Eric

The Imperiled Nile Delta
As the Mediterranean Sea encroaches and the Egyptian population grows, what’s to become of the fertile lands at the mouth of the ancient river?
Peruvian Mummies Revisited { Sharp Eyes of Science Probe the Mummies of Peru}
An Inca maiden, sacrificed on an Andean peak five centuries ago, reveals more secrets.
Tree Giants of North America: Climbing an Ecological Frontier
Suspended hundreds of feet above the ground, scientists investigate the temperate rain forest canopies of the Pacific Northwest.
Joseph Rock { Our Man in China: Joseph Rock}
Explorer and journalist Joseph Rock brought China to life for Geographic readers in the 1920s and ‘ 30s.
Beneath the Tasman Sea
The plankton- rich waters off Australia’s island state host rare and splendid creatures.
Field Notes
The Society’s Committee for Research and Exploration helped fund 200 field projects last year.
Sri Lanka: A Continuing Ethnic War Tarnishes the Pearl of the Indian Ocean
A nation of azure skies and emerald fields in the Indian Ocean is turning crimson from bloody civil conflict.