Search Results for: civil war

National Geographic April 1919

By Eric

On the Trail of a Horse Thief
Cutting a trail of breathtaking beauty, romance, and commercial potential, the powerful Columbia River bestows multiple blessings on Oregon and Washington’s Inland Empire.
The Cone- Dwellers of Asia Minor: A Primitive People Who Live in Nature- Made Apartment Houses, Fashioned by Volcanic Violence and Trickling Streams
A stone’s throw from the cradle of civilization live some cave dwellers who make their home among lava and pumice formations left by an extinct volcano.
The Murman Coast: Arctic Gateway for American and Allied Expeditionary Forces in Northern European Russia
Warmed by the Gulf Stream, an ice- free stretch of Russia along the Arctic Ocean provides a lifeline for the feeding, clothing, and arming of Allied expeditionary forces.
The Ten Thousand Smokes Now a National Monument: The President of the United States Sets Aside for the American People the Extraordinary Valley Discovered and Explored by the National Geographic Society
President Wilson establishes 1, 700 square miles of Alaska hot springs, preeminent among the wonders of the world, as the Katmai National Monument.

National Geographic July 1919

By Eric

Masters of Flight
Eight photographs offer a glimpse of eagles, owls, gulls, terns, a heron, and a pelican.
The Land of Lambskins: An Expedition to Bokhara, Russian Central Asia, to Study the Karakul Sheep Industry
With worldwide demand for furs exceeding supply, the author explores the possibilities of the warm and beautiful pelts of the Karakul lamb, and explores the ancient lifestyles of their shepherds.
The Progressive World Struggle of the Jews for Civil Equality
Subjected to nearly two millennia of persecution, denial of opportunity, and massacre, the world’s Jews have preserved themselves from demoralization and despair with a rich inner life.
A Hunter of Plants
An encomium to the late Frank N. Meyer, the unsung Columbus of horticulture who combed Central Asia and the Far East for plants.
Exploring Unknown Corners of the Hermit Kingdom
Finding an anthropological bonanza previously unseen by Western eyes, an American Museum of Natural History team explores the remote headwaters of Korea’s Yalu and Tumen Rivers.

National Geographic January 1901

By Eric

The Tsangpo
The Tsangpo begins its flow at an altitude of nearly 15, 000 feet. In one unexplored Himalayan region, peopled with Tibetans hostile to foreigners, the river drops 8, 000 feet in 150 miles.
Location of the Boundary Between Nicaragua and Costa Rica
An American arbiter surveys the boundary between Nicaragua and Costa Rica, a source of much anxiety to both nations because of potential revenue from an isthmian canal.
Explorations in Central East Africa
A large expedition numbering nearly 50 men explores unknown country in East Africa, enduring desertions and the death of many baggage animals.
The Influence of Submarine Cables upon Military and Naval Supremacy
Submarine cables facilitate the rapid transmission of information, of paramount strategic value in time of war and a means to connect and civilize the globe.
The Nicaragua Canal
The Isthmian Canal Commission establishes a projected route for a Nicaragua canal and outlines the major engineering problems of the route.
The Indian Tribes of Southern Patagonia, Tierra del Fuego, and the Adjoining Islands
The author spends three years living in southern South America, where he becomes very familiar with four distinct tribes who make their homes in the region.
Recent Contributions to Our Knowledge of the Earth’s Shape and Size, by the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey
The United States, as part of the International Geodetic Association, contributes data to the study of the Earth’s shape.

National Geographic October 1903

By Eric

Peary and the North Pole
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC magazine reprints Commander Peary’s proposal for a final trek to the North Pole and the response of Charles Darling, acting secretary of the Navy.
The Influence of Forestry upon the Lumber Industry of the United States
A timber famine looms on the horizon if the lumber industry fails to adopt policies of conservative forestry.
Directory of Officers and Councillors of Geographic Societies of the United States
Geographic Notes includes information on topics such as the skull of a giant mammoth and the progress of the Philippine Census.
The Geographical Distribution of Insanity in the United States
Including maps and ratios, the author contends that insanity is the result of the stresses incident to the progressive civilized state, and that a predisposition towards insanity may be inherited or acquired.

National Geographic November 1905

By Eric

Geography
Rear Admiral Sir William Wharton defends geography as a genuine science, offering as evidence a history of ancient maps, charts, and navigators, as well as the discoveries of modern geography.
The Supposed Birthplace of Civilizations
Most likely abandoned due to shifts in climate, the buried cities of Turkestan and other areas of central Asia offer clues to a previously fertile land and the civilizations that called it home.
Progress in the Philippines
The Report of the Philippine Commission notes the introduction of an experimental rice thrasher, improved sanitary conditions, and continued work on the Manila harbor system.
Ketchikan
Only the postal service connects Ketchikan, Alaska, to the outside world. But as first port of call for steamers traversing the inland waterway from Puget Sound to Alaska, the promising mining town manages to thrive.
The Returns from Alaska
Despite the enormous wealth issuing from Alaska, roads in the U. S. territory are scarce. With road- building projects in the Canadian Yukon improving profits for that country, arguments for similar expansion in Alaska prevail.
Proportion of Children in the United States
Documenting a persistent drop in birthrates from 1860 on, this overview of the 1905 Census Bureau bulletin offers possible reasons for the decline.
Cotton and the Chinese Boycott
President Theodore Roosevelt addresses an Atlanta audience on the damage to the cotton market effected by Chinese boycotts.
Immigration to the Southern States
Seeking to entice immigrants southward, states like Louisiana and Florida publish pamphlets touting the merits of their land and industries. Though large numbers continue to swell the North and West, these campaigns succeed in drawing many immigrants to;
Forests Vital to Our Welfare
Stressing the deleterious effects of deforestation on commerce, President Theodore Roosevelt appeals to the people of North Carolina and the South in general, urging the implementation of Appalachian forest reserves.

National Geographic October 1908

By Eric

Across Widest Africa
The author traverses Africa from east to west on a year long journey that covers no less than 8, 500 miles.
Conservation League of America
The President has appointed a commission to take account of the nation’s natural resources and their rate of consumption. The Conservation League of America is an association of great organizations being formed to aid in the commission’s work – – the p
Cuzco, America’s Ancient Mecca
The ancient city of Cuzco has the author looking backward, to the glories of Inca civilization and the brutal pageantry of Spanish conquest.
Cork
An evergreen species of the oak tree provides mankind with cork, the outer layer of its bark.
A Comparison of Our Unprotected with Our Protected Forests
Fire damage in areas protected by the Forest Service is but a fraction of that suffered in unprotected woodlands.