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National Geographic April 1955

By Eric

Photographing the Sea’s Dark Underworld: Ocean Depths Surrender Their Secrets to Cameras Towed on Sleds, Dangled on Cables, and Borne by the Bathyscaphe
Ocean depths surrender their secrets to Harold Edgerton, inventor of high- speed flash photography, as he puts his considerable technical talents to work under the sea with the help of Jacques- Yves Cousteau.
Diving Through an Undersea Avalanche: Nearly a Mile Beneath the Mediterranean, the Bathyscaphe Touches Off a Slide Dislodging Tons of Mud
Jacques- Yves Cousteau relates the nerve- racking tale of his descent into an undersea canyon, nearly a mile beneath the Mediterranean.
Spain’s Fortunate Isles, the Canaries: On Colorful Islands Near Africa’s Desert Coast, Devout Canarios Pave City Streets with Blossoms at Corpus Christi Time
On colorful islands off Africa’s northwest coast, devout Canarios pave city streets with blossoms at Corpus Christi time.
Weather from the White North: In Lonely Year- round Vigil, Canadian and American Meteorologists Transmit Vital Data from the Top of the World
In a lonely year- round vigil, Canadian and American meteorologists endure isolation and extreme weather to transmit vital data from the top of the world.
Ohio Makes Its Own Prosperity: Busy Farms and Humming Factories Vie with Art Museums and Research Centers as Attractions of the Thriving Buckeye State
Busy farms and humming factories vie with art museums and research centers as attractions of the thriving Buckeye State.
Patrolling Troubled Formosa Strait
Formosa ( Taiwan) and the Pescadores ( P’ enghu Ch’ untao) endure an uneasy peace under the watchful eye of the U. S. military, as communist China threatens invasion.

National Geographic June 1954

By Eric

New Rush to Golden California: Vast and Varied, Our Fastest- growing State Reveals Its Wonders to Eastern Descendents of a Gold Rush Pioneer
From the giant redwoods to Yosemite’s cliffs, from the bustle of San Francisco’s Chinatown to that city’s great bridges, California is a state of superlatives. It is the fastest growing state in the United States, welcoming immigrants from the eastern
The Lure of the Changing Desert
Life in California’s desert areas is no longer parched and barren, thanks to modern irrigation techniques. The wildlife, however, has remained unchanged for centuries.
Twelve National Geographic Society Scientific Projects Under Way
In 1954, the National Geographic Society sponsored 12 different scientific projects, ranging from investigations of the planet Mars to anthropological studies of primitive tribes of Australia and New Guinea.
The Fabulous Sierra Nevada: Millions Each Year Find Challenge, Adventure, and Self- renewal in California’s Magical Mountains, Highest in the States
Each year millions of adventurous types find challenge, excitement, and perhaps self- renewal in California’s highest mountains. Years ago, gold was the lure, but today, travelers seek scenic beauty.
Sierra High Trip: Hikers Follow Flowery Trails in an Unspoiled Wilderness and Climb Over Snow and Rock to Mount Whitney’s Skyscraping Summit
Each summer, the Sierra Club High Trip takes climbers and hikers on a two- week trek through the Sierra Nevada mountains, to encourage people to learn about mountain country and to gain their help in conservation efforts.
Focusing on the Tournament of Roses: Pasadena’s 64- year- old Festival Ushers in the New Year with a Parade of Spectacular Floats Decked with Two Million Flowers
The Tournament of Roses is more than just a parade before a college football game. This 64- year- old festival in Pasadena, California offers 60 floats decked with more than two million flowers.

National Geographic May 1953

By Eric

The GI and the Kids of Korea: America’s Fighting Men Share Their Food, Clothing, and Shelter with Children of a War- torn Land
The conflict in Korea has orphaned many thousands of children and sent many more adrift without their families. This article details the role of the U. S. Army in rescuing these abandoned waifs, and establishing schools, orphanages, and efforts to provid
School for Survival: High in the Sierra Nevada, Airmen Who May Be Forced Down Learn How to Stay Alive Until Rescued
High in the Sierra Nevada mountains, the U. S. Air Force runs a survival school to teach air crews, who may be forced down in the line of duty, how to stay alive until rescued.
Silkworms in England Spin for the Queen: In a 15th- century Castle, Thousands of Pampered Larvae Make Silk for Elizabeth’s Coronation Robe
The silk farm at Lullingstone Castle in Kent, southeast of London, supplies the material for the coronation robes of Queen Elizabeth II.
American Wild Flower Odyssey: A Lifetime’s Search Covers Deserts, Mountains, and Lowlands; Prizes Range from Maine Orchids to Texas Cacti
The United States has about 25, 000 different species of wildflowers, 28 of which are pictured in this article by the president of the Wild Flower Preservation Society.
Macau, a Hole in the Bamboo Curtain
The tiny Portuguese colony of Macau is an outpost of Western freedom and trade along the border of communist China. It also has a somewhat lurid reputation as a haven for gamblers, smugglers, drug dealers, and spies.
India’s Sculptured Temple Caves
The cliffs of Ajanta and Ellora, in the Indian state of Hyderabad, contain elaborate temples carved from the rock by Buddhist monks, 200 years before the birth of Christ.
Burr Prizes Awarded to Dr. Edgerton and Dr. Van Biesbroeck
For their extraordinary contributions to science in the fields of electrical engineering ( Dr. Edgerton) and astronomy ( Dr. Van Beisbroeck) , these two scientists have been awarded the Society’s Franklin I. Burr prize.

National Geographic March 1951

By Eric

The Caves of the Thousand Buddhas
Tuhnwang, in northwest China, was the last stop for water and supplies along the ancient Silk Road. Few Westerners have visited the Caves of the Thousand Buddhas, where monuments to the Buddha were commissioned by travelers seeking safe journeys.
[ Yankee] Roams the Orient
A report from the fourth voyage of a ship called the Yankee, as the brigantine and her crew complete the second half of their 18- month trip around the world.
Africa’s Uncaged Elephants
A photo- essay by Quentin Keynes, the great- grandson of Charles Darwin, shows a herd of African elephants in their natural habitat.
Long Island Outgrows the Country
A look at Long Island’s contrasts from Brooklyn’s three million residents, through Coney Island and Levittown to the exclusive Hamptons, and the lonely Montauk lighthouse.

National Geographic October 1950

By Eric

Strife- torn Indochina
Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam are the scenes of violence and unrest as numerous factions vie for control of the former French colonies.
Sky- high Bolivia
This photo essay shows everyday life in La Paz, the Bolivian capital located two miles above sea level.
Puya, the Pineapple’s Andean Ancestor
The Puya raimondii, a distant cousin of the pineapple, is the world’s largest bromeliad. This gigantic herb, found only in Bolivia and Peru can grow to a height of more than 30 feet. It blooms once in 150 years and then dies.
Peru, Homeland of the Warlike Inca
In the aftermath of an earthquake that leveled parts of Cuzco, Kip Ross reports on the Inca’s enduring cultural legacy in and around this sacred city.
Seeing the Earth from 80 Miles Up
The U. S. Army has been using captured German V- 2 rockets to explore Earth’s outer atmosphere. Cameras placed in the V- 2 have returned spectacular photos of the Earth from a hitherto- unknown perspective.
Lake Sunapee’s Golden Trout
This photo essay profiles the rare and beautiful golden trout and the efforts to preserve its New England habitat.
Men Against the Hurricane
Peacetime assignments of Navy and Air Force crews include tracking and analyzing hurricanes. The author learns how weather experts predict where hurricanes will go and how to minimize the damage.

National Geographic September 1949

By Eric

Pigeon Netting- -Sport of Basques
A photo- essay highlights the autumn Basque sport of snaring migrating wood pigeons.
Power Comes Back to Peiping
For over 3, 000 years, the city of Peiping ( Beijing) has been a seat of power in China. Following tradition, communist rulers decide to return the government’s capital from Nanking ( Nanjing) to Peiping.
Cruise to Stone Age Arnhem Land
On a voyage to deliver food and supplies to the Arnhem Expedition in northern Australia, the Phoenix runs aground in isolated Boucat Bay and affords her crew an opportunity to get to know aborigines and local missionaries.
Minnesota Makes Ideas Pay
Riding the wave of the postwar boom, Minnesota aims to be in the forefront of intellectual and scientific achievement.
First Motor Sortie into Escalante Land
A joint expedition of the National Geographic Society and the New York Explorers Club is the first to venture by all- wheel- drive into the Escalante wilderness, south of Bryce Canyon National Park.