Search Results for: china

National Geographic February 1963

By Eric

Burma, Gentle Neighbor of India and Red China
Primarily Buddhist and agricultural, Burma is a delicate union of diverse peoples strategically located between communist pressure points in Southeast Asia.
New Era in the Loneliest Continent
Challenged by Antarctica’s harsh climate, scientists study this land’s rugged environment.
Window on Nature: The American Museum of Natural History { Behind New York’s Window on Nature: The American Museum of Natural History}
Each year, the American Museum of Natural History enchants millions of visitors with its unmatched collections, and on- going research spanning the animal, mineral, and human worlds.
Wolves Versus Moose on Isle Royale
Wildlife biologists track the timber wolves of Michigan’s Isle Royale National Park to learn more about their habits and relationship with the moose.

National Geographic March 1962

By Eric

Mountains of the Moon
The towering Ruwenzori mountains straddle the border between Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo and harbor many surprises, including plants that mysteriously grow to outlandish sizes.
Three Whales That Flew
In a carefully orchestrated hunting trip, the New York Aquarium collects live beluga whales from Alaskan waters.
Living Honey Jars of the Ant World
Special workers among the honey ants serve as living storage tanks, holding up to eight times their body weight in honeydew.
Henry Hudson’s River
From sea to source, the author follows a river short in length but long in history.
Journey to Outer Mongolia
Rarely seen by Westerners in the past, this small country surrounded by Russia and China joins the United Nations and the modern world.

National Geographic January 1962

By Eric

Brazil’s Big- lipped Indians
Wooden disks worn in the lower lip distinguish Suya married men and widowers.
Strange Courtship of the Cock- of- the- Rock
An ornithologist combs the rain forest of British Guiana ( Guyana) to record on film the mating dance of a seldom seen bird.
Ghost From the Depths: the Warship [ Vasa]
Restorers raise a cannon- laden Swedish galleon from the watery grave where she lay since 1628.
Florida’s Coral City Beneath the Sea
Jerry Greenberg photographs the life- filled vistas of a unique 50, 000- acre underwater park.
America’s First Undersea Park { Key Largo Coral Reef: America’s First Undersea Park}
Visitors put on diving gear to visit this delicate underwater ecosystem.
Easter Island and Its Mysterious Monuments
Massive heads carved of stone stand vigil on this island so remote, that the only visitors arrive aboard the annual supply ship.
Hong Kong Has Many Faces
Refugees from China swell the work force of Asia’s rising manufacturing center.

National Geographic March 1959

By Eric

Peru Profits from Sea Fowl
Ocean currents bear plentiful food to Peru’s coastal islands, ideal habitat for countless seabirds whose waste is used as valuable fertilizer.
New St. Lawrence Seaway Opens the Great Lakes to the World
The most ambitious construction project since the Panama Canal promises to be an economic and engineering coup for the United States and Canada.
Children of the Sun and Moon
Some 400 Kraho indians cling to their ancient ways of hunting and gathering on the savannas of Brazil.
Life under Shellfire on Quemoy
Military watchdogs on this Nationalist outpost, scan for Communist artillery shelling from five miles away on mainland China’s shores, while islanders persevere with their daily routine.
Portugal’s Gem of the Ocean: Madeira
Some of the world’s highest sea cliffs rise to 2, 000 feet on an island where farmers have built terraces and canals to make the most of arable land.

National Geographic August 1945

By Eric

London Wins the Battle
Bombings from V- 1 and V- 2 rockets battered London during War World II. How residents survived the blitz is the subject of Marquis W. Childs’s story of tragedy and heroism.
Grass Makes Wyoming Fat
The wealth of Wyoming is built upon grass- bountiful grazing land for cattle and sheep. Frederick Simpich visits the state best known for its Wild- West culture and majestic natural beauty.
Greens Grow for GI’s on Soilless Ascension
GIs stationed on lonely and remote Ascension Island in the South Atlantic, are able to enrich their diets with fresh vegetables, grown thanks to the magic of hydroponics.
American Alma Maters in the Near East
Maynard Owen Williams visits his alma mater in Turkey and other Middle Eastern institutions of higher learning, where the western scientific method and modern coeducation exist alongside traditional Islamic styles of learning.
China’s Hand- built Air Bases
An uncredited photo essay depicts the manual labor of thousands of Chinese workers building air bases for fighter planes in the war against the Japanese.
Saga of the Carrier [ Princeton]
The U. S. Navy’s aircraft carrier Princeton began her active war career in the assault and occupation of Baker Island, in 1943. The Princeton participated in every major naval operation in the Pacific until she was lost in battle. Her commanding officer

National Geographic March 1957

By Eric

Children’s Art Around the World
A Philadelphia artist’s collection showcases elves, dervishes, and dancing grasshoppers portrayed in the guileless style of children.
History Awakens at Harpers Ferry: Where West Virginia Meets the Blue Ridge, a Town That Remembers John Brown’s Raid Becomes a New National Monument
Strategically located at the confluence of two rivers, this West Virginia town saw John Brown’s raid of the federal armory, followed by skirmishes between North and South that left the burg in ruins.
Stalking the Great Indian Rhino: Asia’s Armor- plated Rhinoceros, Who Carries a Fortune on His Nose, Makes a Last Stand in Sanctuaries Deep in Assam’s Rainy Wilds
Only a few hundred of these massive beasts survive the demand for farmland and, more critically, for their medicinally valuable horns.
MATS: America’s Long Arm of the Air: To Stay in Fighting Trim, Flying Truck Drivers of the Military Air Transport Service Operate a World- girdling Airline
The Flying Truck Drivers of the Military Air Transport Service move more cargo than the five largest U. S. commerical airlines combined.
Changing Formosa, Green Island of Refuge: Spurred by United States Aid, Nationalist China’s Offshore Stronghold Takes Giant Strides Toward Self- sufficiency in the Free World
Nationalist Chinese work toward self- sufficiency alongside native Taiwanese, with U. S. aid and Western influence shaping their goals.
John Oliver La Gorce Is Elected Vice- Chairman of the Board, Melville Bell Grosvenor President and Editor of the National Geographic Society
The Society’s new Editor and President salutes his predecessor.
Freedom Flight from Hungary: A Story in Photographs
Driven over the border into Austria by Soviet tanks, tens of thousands of Hungarians seek freedom from oppression.
Paris Flea Market: Bargain- hunter’s Paradise: Wares Range from Antique Silver to Glass Eyes and Zinc Birdbaths; Haggling Is Half the Fun, but Let the Buyer Beware
Franc Shor speaks pig latin in his bid for an antique desk – – with mixed results.