National Geographic November 2001 Back Issue

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National Geographic Magazine November 2001

National Geographic November 2001

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Hippos: An African Spring Comes Alive { Kenya's Mzima Spring; Kenya's Mzima Spring Comes Alive}
Kenya's Mzima Spring In a protected oasis of clear pools, hippos choreograph a remarkable dance of life, joined by dung- eating fish, fish- spearing birds, and contented crocodiles. ARTICLE AND PHOTOGRAPHS BY MARK DEEBLE AND VICTORIA STONE
Evolution of Whales: Strange Route to the Sea { Evolution of Whales}
Evolution of Whales Earth's largest animals are sometimes born with a leg or two, a startling genetic reminder of the time, 50 million years ago, when their ancestors walked on dry land. BY DOUGLAS H. CHADWICK PHOTOGRAPHS BY ROBERT CLARK ART BY SHAWN GO
King Cobras: Deadly Idols { King Cobras: Feared, Revered}
King Cobras Capable of killing an elephant, these shy Asian forest dwellers have become entwined with some unflappable humans. ARTICLE AND PHOTOGRAPHS BY MATTIAS KLUM
Pyramids: Who Built Them? { The Pyramid Builders}
The Pyramid Builders An ancient city and graveyard reveal that free men and women- not slaves- toiled on the pharaohs'tombs. BY VIRGINIA MORELL PHOTOGRAPHS BY KENNETH GARRETT
Russia: Ten Years After { Russia Rising}
Russia Rising Clambering from the collapse of the U. S. S. R. , Russia has emerged a decade later with four- star restaurants, cyber- cafes, Santa Claus- and social ills. Can it speed its halting progress? BY FEN MONTAIGNE PHOTOGRAPHS BY GERD LUDWIG
Steelville, MO: The Zip in the Middle { ZipUSA: 65565: The Middle of America; ZipUSA: Steelville, Missouri}
ZipUSA: Steelville, Missouri Heart of the country, this Ozarks town gets by on what the creeks and woods offer. BY PETER DE ] ONGE PHOTOGRAPHS BY WILLIAM ALBERT ALLARD
Auroras: Heavenly Lights { Earth's Grand Light Show; Auroras: Earth's Grand Show of Lights}
Earth's Grand Light Show Splashing the sky with radiant hues, auroras can crash power grids and satellite systems even as they delight scientists and spectators with their glowing gases. BY KENNY TAYLOR

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