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2018 July – December

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  • National Geographic July 2018

    Faster. Higher. Smarter. Stronger.

    Scientists are pushing the limits of human athletic performance

    Predators in the Night

    Meat-eating bats haunt a Maya temple.

    Faces of the Future

    In the United States today, Latinos are a major focus of the immigration debate. But in communities nationwide, they're established, rising to power, and offering a glimpse of what's ahead for the nation.

    Power Struggle

    Puerto Rico is recovering from the longest blackout in U.S. history.

    Lost at Sea

    Rarely seen seabirds are suffering declines.

    Wild Gems of Russia

    Russia has imposed its strictest land-use protections on 85 million acres. That's more than any other country - and only the beginning of the story.

    30 Years of Climate Lessons

    As the problem of human-driven climate change has grown, the response has not kept pace.

    Landscape Activism

    Kate Orff designs resilient coasts and waterways for the future.

    Creating the World

    What does it take to model Earth? Peer into the tool kit of a bespoke globemaker.

    Clean Energy in a Coal Mine

    In Germany an old mine may become an underground battery for wind and solar energy.

    13 in stock

  • National Geographic August 2018

    The Science of Sleep

    Though slumber may look like an idle state, new science reveals that our brains aren't less active when we sleep - just differently active. On a good night, we'll cycle repeatedly through several stages, each with distinct qualities and purpose.

    Poisoning Africa

    To stop predators that kill livestock, Kenya's herders put out toxic bait - and end up poisoning the ecosystem.

    Butterfly Catchers

    Winged beauties and up on a black market.

    Historic Whalers

    Remains of a Basque galleon shed light on whalers' life and work.

    Health Care Crisis

    Yemen's war makes it harder and costlier to get medical treatment.

    Endangered Birds

    When one-of-a-kind species are on the verge of extinction, what persuades people to save them? Maybe the right images.

    Are We as Awful as We Act Online?

    It's not human nature that sparks mean posts and tweets. But evolution does play a role.

    Earth-Friendly Transit

    Transportation systems help cities stem pollution, increase livability.

    An Image's Impact

    They shared a photo to warn of climate threats to wildlife but the message got sidetracked.

    Coral Reef Loss

    Rising sea surface temperatures cause coral bleaching and death at landmarks like the Great Barrier Reef.

    6 in stock

  • National Geographic September 2018

    Katie's New Face

    Identity. Experience. Emotion. The human face expresses all this and much more. As a result of one impulsive act, a teenager lost her face. Incredible medical advances and skilled surgeons made it possible for her to get a new one.

    Passage to Another Time

    Walking among the peaks of Central Asia.

    Helmeted Hornbills Struggle to Survive

    The heads of these rare birds have become a target for traffickers.

    Building a New American Dream

    Expanding on their immigrant parents' successes, second-generation South Asian Americans are increasingly visible. And some are leaving their forebears' career paths to take on new roles: politician, astronaut, stand-up comedian.

    Rockets for Regular Folks

    Each year in the Nevada desert, hobbyists gather to launch high-powered projectiles thousands of feet into the sky.

    Bacteria Strike Back

    Antibiotic resistance is on the rise, thanks to an evolutionary trick.

    New Silent Spring

    Birds are disappearing from French farmlands

    Life on Cheese

    The bacteria and fungi that live in cheese rinds are tiny - but may lead to solutions for some big world problems.

    This Look Could Have Killed

    In a cave teeming with bats and snakes, a photographer thought he knew dangers.

    10 in stock

  • National Geographic October 2018

    Threatened by the Outside World

    Tribes in the Amazon.

    Scary, Squishy, Brainless, Beautiful

    What makes jellyfish so fascinating?

    Iran's Nomads, Fading Away

    Hardship brings change to a way of life.

    Rulers of the Sky

    Humans and falcons have been partners for millennia.

    I Am an American

    Scenes from the Japanese internment still resonate today.

    American Tapestry

    Census data reveal two and a half centuries of migration, conflict, and prosperity.

    11 in stock

  • National Geographic November 2018

    Battle for the American West

    Who gets to choose how the land is used?

    Saving the Sage Grouse

    It's a symbol in debates about land use versus conservation. It's also a bird species in decline.

    Menu of the Future

    Coming to your table: dishes featuring grass, insects, and algae.

    Flooding History

    A controversial dam in Turkey will destroy an ancient settlement.

    Caught in Chaos

    As thousands of migrants flee Venezuela for Brazil, they take their woes with them.

    A Crack in the World

    Life at the Antarctic Peninsula needs sea ice and krill to survive. What if they go away?

    16 in stock

  • National Geographic December 2018

    The Bible Hunters

    Archaeologists are on an urgent mission to save sacred texts.

    Native Americans Reclaim Their Stories

    Indigenous Americans are changing narratives that they call distorted.

    Paragonia's Pumas

    To ranchers, they're a costly predator; to tourists, an attraction.

    The Other Oil Crisis

    Palm oil is a coveted commodity around the world. Can it be sustainably produced?

    Our World, but Not Our Worldview

    Native Americans too often are caricatured in the U.S. - or are invisible.

    Heroes of the Philippines

    For sending wages from abroad to assist their families, returning Filipinos are celebrated.

    4 in stock

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